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The Hastening that Waits

December 11th, 2017

"‘I know you’re in a hurry.’ I wonder if you’ve ever said that, asking for a person’s attention, when it’s clear they’re rushing to something else. And you could simply say, ‘Don’t worry, we can talk about it later, I’ll send you an email, it’s not urgent,’ and permanently or temporarily fade into the background of their life."

A sermon from Revd Dr Sam Wells, delivered on the Second Sunday of Advent.

Readings for this service: 2 Peter 3: 8-15a

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Every Saint has a Past and Every Sinner a Future

December 8th, 2017

"Have you ever met someone who you thought was holy or even a saint? Following this last week in British political and national life it seems hardly surprising that we have all grown a little wary of those who set themselves up as role models or representatives of virtue."

A sermon from Revd Richard Carter, delivered on All Saints Day. 

Readings for this service: Matthew 5.1-13

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I Would Start from Here

December 7th, 2017

"In the flower shops you can already buy yellow spring daffodils. But I never buy them in winter. Not because I don’t like them but because I believe deep down you have to go through the winter waiting before you can reach those yellow and golds of spring and appreciate them for what they are."

A sermon from Revd Richard Carter, delivered on the First Sunday of Advent.

Readings for this service: Isaiah 64. 1-9, 1 Corinthians 1. 3-9, Mark 13. 24-end

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Christ the King: On the 25th Anniversary of Richard Carter’s ordination

December 5th, 2017

'In the service for the ordination of priests we hear these words. “Priests are called to be shepherds and servants among the people to whom they are sent, they are to proclaim the word of the Lord and watch for the signs of God’s new creation.”'

A sermon from Revd Katherine Hedderly, delivered on Christ the King.

Readings for this service: Ezekiel 34.11-16, 20-24; Ephesians 1. 15-end; Matthew 25. 31-end

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What Do You Take Me For?

November 22nd, 2017

"There’s two common assumptions about Christianity. One is that’s it’s a theory about how things are – how things began and how the world goes round. The other is that it’s basically a moral code. Those two assumptions are widely held by the church’s cultured despisers; but they’re actually quite common within the church too."

A sermon from Revd Dr Sam Wells, delivered on the Second Sunday before Advent.

Readings for this service: Matthew 25. 14-30

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War is about real people

November 20th, 2017

"My grandfather wasn’t a hero, he didn’t hate foreigners, and he wasn’t a psychopath. But on 5th October, 1915, the day after his 21st birthday, he signed up as a private in the Queen’s Westminster Rifles to fight in the First World War."

A sermon from Revd Will Morris, delivered on Remembrance Sunday

Readings for this service: Amos 5. 18-24, 1 Thess. 4. 13-end, Matthew 25. 1-13

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Reforming Scripture with Ben Quash

November 14th, 2017

A talk with Ben Quash given on Monday 13 November 2017, as part of the St Martin-in-the-Fields Autumn Lecture Series – Reformation. The talk is moderated by Revd Dr Sam Wells.

About the series 

On 31 October 1517, Martin Luther pinned 95 Theses to the church door in Wittenberg, protesting against the practice of indulgences and touching on questions of grace, repentance and forgiveness. The Reformation was a culmination of events and circumstances that led to a seismic shift in the religious framework of Britain. It established the image of an island nation, separate and supreme, still resonant today. It triggered a religious and political redistribution of power. It led to renewal and reform but also deep division, persecution and violence. And out of this turmoil were born the concepts of state and church as we know them today.

The 500th Anniversary of the beginning of the Reformation provides the opportunity to explore and reflect upon issues of church, state, and religious and cultural diversity that are still at the centre of our national life: the conflicts that divide, and the convictions which diverse parts of the Christian church hold sacred. How are we called to be reformed by the Gospel? How do we build the unity Christ called for with those whose convictions are very different from our own? In this autumn lecture series we will be exploring some of those hopes and controversies.

About the speaker

Professor Ben Quash is Professor of Christianity and the Arts at King’s College London. He was Chaplain and Fellow of Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge, and a lecturer in the Cambridge Theological Federation from 1996-1999, he then returned to Peterhouse as Dean and Fellow until he came to King’s as Professor in 2007. He has developed research and public education programmes in Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their interrelations and, in particular, methods of scriptural reasoning. His most recent books are: Abiding (Archbishop of Canterbury’s Lent Book 2013); Reflections on the Psalms 2015; and with Aaron Rosen Visualising a Sacred City: London Art and Religion, 2016.

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Reforming Attitudes to Islam with Mona Siddiqui, Joshua Ralston and Sam Wells

November 8th, 2017

A talk with Mona Siddiqui and Joshua Ralston given on Monday 6 November 2017, as part of the St Martin-in-the-Fields Autumn Lecture Series – Reformation. The talk is moderated by Revd Dr Sam Wells.

About the series 

On 31 October 1517, Martin Luther pinned 95 Theses to the church door in Wittenberg, protesting against the practice of indulgences and touching on questions of grace, repentance and forgiveness. The Reformation was a culmination of events and circumstances that led to a seismic shift in the religious framework of Britain. It established the image of an island nation, separate and supreme, still resonant today. It triggered a religious and political redistribution of power. It led to renewal and reform but also deep division, persecution and violence. And out of this turmoil were born the concepts of state and church as we know them today.

The 500th Anniversary of the beginning of the Reformation provides the opportunity to explore and reflect upon issues of church, state, and religious and cultural diversity that are still at the centre of our national life: the conflicts that divide, and the convictions which diverse parts of the Christian church hold sacred. How are we called to be reformed by the Gospel? How do we build the unity Christ called for with those whose convictions are very different from our own? In this autumn lecture series we will be exploring some of those hopes and controversies.

About the speakers

Mona Siddiqui OBE is Professor of Islamic and Interreligious Studies at the School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh. She is Assistant Principal for Religion and Society and Dean International for the Middle East. Her most recent monographs include Christians, Muslims and Jesus and Hospitality and Islam, Welcoming in God’s Name. She is a regular broadcaster commentator and writer and chairs the BBC’s Scottish Religious Advisory Committee. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Royal Society of Arts; she has received five honorary doctorates and is among Debrett’s 500 most influential people in the UK.

Dr Joshua Ralston is Lecturer in Muslim-Christian Relations at the School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh, having previously been on the faculty of Union Presbyterian Seminary in Richmond, Virginia. He has been a visiting lecturer in Christian-Muslim Relations in both Aba, Nigeria and Cairo, Egypt, and regularly lectures in both academic and public forums. He co-edited The Church in an Age of Migration: A Moving Body, and his monograph, Law and the Rule of God: Shari’a in Christian-Muslim Debate, will be out early next year.

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I May Not Get There With You

October 31st, 2017

A sermon by Revd Dr Sam Wells

Readings for this service: Deuteronomy 34: 1-14

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Give to God the Things that are God’s

October 31st, 2017

A sermon by Revd Richard Carter

Readings for this service: Exodus 33. 12-end, Matthew 22. 15-22

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