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Reforming Attitudes to Race with David Olusoga and Liz Adekunle

October 17th, 2017

A talk from David Olusoga and Liz Adekunle given on Monday 16 October 2017, as part of the St Martin-in-the-Fields Autumn Lecture Series – Reformation. The talk is introduced and moderated by Revd Richard Carter.

About the series 

On 31 October 1517, Martin Luther pinned 95 Theses to the church door in Wittenberg, protesting against the practice of indulgences and touching on questions of grace, repentance and forgiveness. The Reformation was a culmination of events and circumstances that led to a seismic shift in the religious framework of Britain. It established the image of an island nation, separate and supreme, still resonant today. It triggered a religious and political redistribution of power. It led to renewal and reform but also deep division, persecution and violence. And out of this turmoil were born the concepts of state and church as we know them today.

The 500th Anniversary of the beginning of the Reformation provides the opportunity to explore and reflect upon issues of church, state, and religious and cultural diversity that are still at the centre of our national life: the conflicts that divide, and the convictions which diverse parts of the Christian church hold sacred. How are we called to be reformed by the Gospel? How do we build the unity Christ called for with those whose convictions are very different from our own? In this autumn lecture series we will be exploring some of those hopes and controversies.

About the speakers

David Olusoga is a British-Nigerian historian, broadcaster and film-maker. Born in Lagos, Nigeria, David is a multi-award-winning presenter. His most recent series include Black and British: A Forgotten History (BBC 2), The World’s War (BBC 2) and the BAFTA winning Britain’s Forgotten Slave Owners (BBC 2). David is also the author of Black & British: A Forgotten History (Macmillan, 2016) and The World’s War (Head of Zeus, 2014). David also writes for The Guardian and The Observer and BBC History Magazine and is one of the three presenters on the BBC’s new landmark Arts series, Civilisations.

Liz Adekunle was born in North London and read theology at Birmingham University. She has two Masters degrees; the first from SOAS in African Christianity and Development and the second, completed while she was in training at Ridley Hall, Cambridge. She is esteemed as a former Chaplain and tutor at St Mellitus College, former Chaplain and Acting Dean at St John’s College, Cambridge and is also a member of the Archbishops’ Task Group on Evangelism. Liz is the Archdeacon of Hackney and was appointed as a Chaplain to her Majesty the Queen in April 2017.

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Reforming Marriage with Nicholas Holtam, David Monteith and Sally Hitchiner

October 10th, 2017

A talk from Nicholas Holtam, David Monteith and Sally Hitchiner given on Monday 9 October 2017, as part of the St Martin-in-the-Fields Autumn Lecture Series – Reformation. A question and answer session follows the lecture.

About the series 

On 31 October 1517, Martin Luther pinned 95 Theses to the church door in Wittenberg, protesting against the practice of indulgences and touching on questions of grace, repentance and forgiveness. The Reformation was a culmination of events and circumstances that led to a seismic shift in the religious framework of Britain. It established the image of an island nation, separate and supreme, still resonant today. It triggered a religious and political redistribution of power. It led to renewal and reform but also deep division, persecution and violence. And out of this turmoil were born the concepts of state and church as we know them today.

The 500th Anniversary of the beginning of the Reformation provides the opportunity to explore and reflect upon issues of church, state, and religious and cultural diversity that are still at the centre of our national life: the conflicts that divide, and the convictions which diverse parts of the Christian church hold sacred. How are we called to be reformed by the Gospel? How do we build the unity Christ called for with those whose convictions are very different from our own? In this autumn lecture series we will be exploring some of those hopes and controversies.

About the speakers

Nicholas Holtam has been Bishop of Salisbury since 2011. For the Church of England he is the lead bishop on the environment and chairs a committee for ministry with and among deaf and disabled people. From 1995-2011 Nick was the Vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields where one of the things he learned is that diverse people are called into God’s kingdom. Because he believes marriage matters he has supported equal marriage and hopes that in time the Church will come to see the goodness of supporting people in a fruitful relationship that is permanent, faithful and stable.

David Monteith has been Dean of Leicester since 2013. During this time the Cathedral has completed the first stage of its redevelopment with the reinternment of King Richard III. In one of Britain’s most multicultural cities, the cathedral offers generous Christian hospitality to all. He has previously served in Birmingham and London, including at St Martin-in-the-Fields. Originally from Enniskillen, Northern Ireland he shares long-term interests in music, poetry and the visual arts with a commitment to living with diversity. He shares his life in a Civil Partnership with David Hamilton.

Sally Hitchiner is the Coordinating Chaplain and Interfaith Adviser for Brunel University London. She is also the founder and MD of Diverse Church a support network for over 700 LGBT Christians in the UK and Ireland. She trained at York and Oxford before spending time as a parish priest in Ealing where she led a large congregation linked to her church’s soup kitchen. She regularly speaks in the national news on issues of faith and current affairs and is a regular newspaper analyst on BBC Breakfast. She recently entered into a Civil Partnership with Fiona.

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Reforming Church with Lucy Winkett and Sam Wells

October 5th, 2017

A talk from Lucy Winkett and Sam Wells given on Monday 2 October 2017, as part of the St Martin-in-the-Fields Autumn Lecture Series – Reformation. A question and answer session follows the lecture.

 

About the series 

On 31 October 1517, Martin Luther pinned 95 Theses to the church door in Wittenberg, protesting against the practice of indulgences and touching on questions of grace, repentance and forgiveness. The Reformation was a culmination of events and circumstances that led to a seismic shift in the religious framework of Britain. It established the image of an island nation, separate and supreme, still resonant today. It triggered a religious and political redistribution of power. It led to renewal and reform but also deep division, persecution and violence. And out of this turmoil were born the concepts of state and church as we know them today.

The 500th Anniversary of the beginning of the Reformation provides the opportunity to explore and reflect upon issues of church, state, and religious and cultural diversity that are still at the centre of our national life: the conflicts that divide, and the convictions which diverse parts of the Christian church hold sacred. How are we called to be reformed by the Gospel? How do we build the unity Christ called for with those whose convictions are very different from our own? In this autumn lecture series we will be exploring some of those hopes and controversies.

About the speakers

Lucy Winkett was ordained in 1995, having worked previously as a professional soprano. One of the first generation of women to be ordained in the Church of England, she served her title in Manor Park, Newham before becoming the first woman priest appointed at St Paul’s Cathedral, later becoming Canon Precentor. She has been Rector of St James’s, Piccadilly since 2010. With degrees in history and theology, she broadcasts regularly on religion, gender and contemporary culture and is a longstanding contributor to Radio 4’s ‘Thought for the Day’. She was a founding adviser for the public theology think tank Theos and was co-founder of Leading Women, a national development programme for women clergy. Her book Our Sound is Our Wound was the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Lent Book for 2011. In 2014, she was awarded an honorary doctorate by Winchester University.

Revd Dr Sam Wells is Vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields, and a widely-known preacher, pastor, writer, broadcaster, and theologian. He has served as a Church of England parish priest for 19 years. He also spent 7 years in North Carolina, where he was Dean of Duke University Chapel. Sam is also Visiting Professor of Christian Ethics at King’s College London. He has published 27 books, including academic studies and textbooks in Christian ethics, explorations of social mission, liturgy and Anglican faith, and four collections of sermons. His most recent book is Hanging by a Thread.

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Broken?

October 3rd, 2017

“Learning to live courageously, just where we are, with the assurance of God’s presence is what Jacob discovers in the encounter with God in his dream. God is judge but a judge who comes to be alongside us, patiently present with us, offering us a new way to live.”

A sermon from Revd Katherine Hedderly, delivered on the Sixth Sunday after Trinity.

Readings for this service: Genesis 28. 10-19a; Romans 8. 12-25; Matthew 13. 24-30, 36-42

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The Mustard Seed

October 3rd, 2017

“I wonder how often we have seen the seed planted and wondered what it will become. Of course the planting is an act of risk and trust. How many parents go through this process with their children both longing for them and yet also fearing for them. How many times all of us have wondered what will become of someone we love?”

A sermon from Revd Richard Carter, delivered on the Seventh Sunday after Trinity.

Readings for this service: Romans 8.26-end Matthew 13.31-33, 42-52

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Wrestling in the Dark

October 3rd, 2017

“It’s possible that you’ve come to St Martin’s this morning in a state of complete satisfaction with life. However, in the world where we’re tortuously navigating Brexit, where we’re seeing democracy breaking down and a fresh rise in dictatorial leadership, and where we’re facing questions about the sustainability of life on planet earth, you’d need to have closed yourself off to our world to have reached such a state. More likely, if you’ve been keeping yourself open, you’ve found yourself singing along with U2: ‘I’ve run, I’ve crawled, I’ve scaled the city walls – but I still haven’t found what I’m looking for.'”

A sermon from Revd Dr Alastair McKay, delivered on the Eighth Sunday after Trinity.

Readings for this service: Genesis 32:22-31

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The Paradox of Church

October 3rd, 2017

“We want to do our own thing. We don’t want to be children, constantly being told what do, shown how to do it, corrected when we make mistakes, patronised, humiliated, ignored. We want to do our own thing. We want to train in something and then go freelance, work to our own timetable, set up our own company, not be at the beck and call of an institution that’s set in its ways or an organisation that’s lost its humanity. In short, we want to be free.”

A sermon from Revd Dr Sam Wells, delivered on the Ninth Sunday after Trinity.

Readings for this service:  Matthew 14: 22-33

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The Boundary-less Way of God

October 3rd, 2017

“At the time Jesus lived, the Jewish people saw the world divided into two categories of people – themselves and everyone else. A Jewish person then regarded foreigners (known as Gentiles) as morally unclean and more profoundly, spiritually lost. For, to the Jewish people, they themselves were God’s chosen, and Gentiles, or all others, were not.”

A sermon from Revd Canon Paul-Gordon Chandler, delivered on the Tenth Sunday after Trinity.

Readings for this service: Matthew 15:21-28

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Wonder

October 3rd, 2017

“Our Gospel today asks a profound question – not a question of achievement but identity and personhood. “But who do you say that I am?” This question comes about half way through the Gospel account and the remarkable thing about Jesus is that he has never told them or tried to prove his credentials or his status.”

A sermon from Revd Richard Carter, delivered on the Eleventh Sunday after Trinity.

Readings for this service: Matthew 16.13-20

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Present in our Midst

October 3rd, 2017

“Jesus repeatedly warns his disciples about the dangers and suffering that will come. Yet strangely he does not warn his disciples because he wants them to avoid the struggle, or escape the suffering. Rather it seems a call to be awake, to read the signs of the times, to be present in the time of tribulation: in the midst of danger to be attentive to God and to one another.”

A sermon from Revd Richard Carter, delivered on the Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity.

Readings for this service: Romans 13.8-end, Matthew 18.15-20

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